Managed Services in Language Industry

Miloš Matović 2 years ago Comment

The main benefits of this language services model are process optimization and the reduction of costs and time, as well as improved translation quality and consistency.

Managed Services in Language Industry | Blog | Ciklopea
Model storitev upravljanja pravzaprav deluje kot skupno podjetje dveh ali več podjetij, specializiranih za različna področja.

The outsourcing model of Managed Services was originally developed in the early 1980s by MSPs (Managed Services Providers) from the IT industry. As technology rapidly spread into virtually every type of business, the concept of managed services came to include solutions from various industries, including the localization and translation services.

Translation Project Management for Hire

The Managed Services model essentially functions as a joint venture of two or more companies specialized in different fields.

For example, if an organization or a company already has a translation or localization team and defined internal linguistic processes, but wants to optimize the process, reduce costs and time required for translation, it can use project management services of a dedicated LSP.

Thus, the language services provider (in this case, in the role of an MSP) manages the internal localization or translation project of another company (i.e. the client), using its own procedures, experience, skills and expertise and working closely with the client.

The clients, however, remain fully involved and the process is optimized in accordance with their requirements. Linguistic managed services can be used temporarily or they can become a regular, day-to-day service of an external localization or translation project manager working with the internal linguistic team.

The results are a faster, less time-consuming and more cost-efficient translation or localization process and more consistent, higher quality translation.

Benefits of Managed Services

The main benefits of this language services model are process optimization and the reduction of costs and time, as well as improved translation quality and consistency.

The expert language industry MSP first examines the current internal translation and localization process, detects weaknesses in the process (this may include a wide range of factors, from the translators’ expertise and their methods of work to the use of CAT tools and the creation of term bases and translation memories).

Once the existing process is thoroughly examined, the MSP suggests necessary changes, develops a new translation or localization process or updates the existing one and designs the best possible solution for project optimization.

The results include a faster, less time-consuming and more cost-efficient translation or localization process and more consistent translation of higher quality.

Like This Article? Subscribe to Receive More Via Email

  • receive a digest with new articles
  • up to 2 emails a month

Comments

Related Articles

eLearning Localization: Building a Global Education System

2 months ago

When I first started writing this article, I had to decide how I’m going to style the head noun of the title. Is it e-Learning with a hyphen or without it and what’s the difference anyway? So, I did a little research and found out that the former was used in the earlier days when the concept was still new and unfamiliar to many. But as it was rising and slowly becoming a regular part of our lives, we dropped the hyphen so we could save ourselves from pressing one more key of the keyboard. That’s how I got to learn something new, even if it’s as banal as learning how to style a word.

Continue reading

The Missing Piece In Translating Clinical Research Materials

2 months ago

That dreadful phrase bad translation has two distinct meanings – first, there is the obvious one, a text (or any other material) replete with errors in meaning, style, grammar and orthography and second, the more serious one, including delayed and cancelled product launches, loss of time, resources and energy and, most dreadful of them all, negative representation on a foreign market, which is also the price of a bad translation.

How to prevent it?

Continue reading