Should Startups Consider Localization?

Miloš Matović 5 years ago Comment

Every startup has essentially one advantage when compared to big companies – a clean slate and the possibility to create a unique corporate identity and write a whole new success story, without being burdened by the failures or successes of the past. Beginnings are always exciting and promising, but for these very reasons they are also risky and that is why the examples of big companies should not be ignored. This article features some of the translation and localization lessons every startup can learn from the big companies.

Think globally from day one

The world has shrunk. The space and distance are not an issue they used to be only decades ago. Thinking globally about your product/service from day one is one of the smartest things you can do – and to achieve the global visibility and reach global customers you need to localize your content.

Professional human translation is always worth It

Can you imagine any really big international company debating the ROI of translation? We can’t either. Have you ever seen any material from a successful international company presented in a bad or awkward target language? We haven’t, either.

Virtually every study ever conducted shows that people are more likely to purchase product/service that is presented in their language and in accordance with their culture. In the long run, it always pays off.

Machines can’t do it

Translators use computers to save time and provide consistent translations. The language industry of today is unimaginable without specific software and databases. But using the benefits of technology as a tool and delegating the entire translation process to machines are two quite different things. Translation is a sophisticated operation that simply can’t be done properly without a professional human touch.

LSP is your partner

Find the language service provider you can trust, the one with the experience and deep knowledge of the culture of the target market.

Very soon you will realize that your chosen LSP is your friend that will help you cut the translation costs, time and effort and send your corporate message to the target market in an appropriate and effective manner, and that its services may be valuable for more than just linguistic tasks as localization is also very much about culture, habits, needs and expectations of a target audience.

Remember, different markets require different approaches. Your localization consultant is there to help you find the right approach for your chosen market.

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