Language

Walking the Technical Side of Localization: Orchestrating QA, OCR and DTP to Really Work for You

Ciklopea 3 months ago Comment

On the execution level, every localization project has two major distinct dimensions – linguistic and technical. While the linguistic dimension encompasses language adaptation issues, such as language pairs, translation, and review, technical dimension includes physical aspects of the project, such as file formats, required software, digital resources and various additional services that need to be performed before, during and after the project, all with the aim of ensuring the quality and usability of the final localized materials. Both dimensions are of equal importance and we may say that the difference between translation and localization happens at the junction point of these two dimensions.

Continue reading

The Pivot Language Approach and Multilingual Localization Projects: How and When it Works

Ciklopea 3 months ago Comment

According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, pivot is “a fixed point supporting something which turns or balances, or a person or thing on which something else depends”. If we imagine for a moment the localization process as a mechanism, the source material will have the function of the pivot, because in every possible scenario, from AI-powered machine translation with post-editing to the good old translation and proofreading, the quality of the source material is the factor that will always dictate both the process efficiency and the ultimate quality of the localized materials, regardless of all the technical magic and linguistic knowledge involved.

Continue reading

Language Quality: Why Should You Even Care?

Miloš Matović 1 year ago Comment

Nobody likes the grammar police of the internet. Unless somebody is typing an email or any other material with the purpose to truly make an impression, spellcheckers usually annoy people. Nobody likes being corrected  for something so banal as language because people tend to view language as nothing more than a communication tool and don’t bother with it as long as it works. Fair enough. So why should you even care about the language quality at all?

Continue reading